Crown Decorating Centres continue charitable drive in communities

National paint manufacturer Crown Paints has continued to invest in its local communities with a raft of donations that are designed to add some colour to people’s lives.

The company’s Blackburn Crown Decorating Centre took on the Community Challenge set by Burnley-based window and door systems company, VEKA Group, to help the children of Whittlefield Primary School to transform an old school bus into a magical new library.

Whittlefield School’s project was selected after winning a popular vote in the Community Challenge competition, which was run in partnership with regional radio station 2BR. The Crown Decorating Centre donated dozens of litres of paint in nine different colours, which 45 volunteers used to completely transform the bus in just five weeks.

The finished bus is a totally unique space that has given the school a dedicated library that will inspire generations of schoolchildren. The finished design, which was decorated with characters and scenes from children’s stories, was officially unveiled by the Mayor of Burnley, Charlie Briggs, a former pupil at the school. The school also invited local author Linda Sutherland and Paul Duckworth, who heads the ‘Let’s Get Reading’ initiative across Lancashire.

Commenting on the project, VEKA’s marketing director Dawn Stockell said: “We were thrilled to work on what became the ‘Whittlefield Woodland Library Bus’. We couldn’t wait to roll up our sleeves and get stuck in, and the transformation has been incredible; creating the unique reading space the children deserve.

“Along with VEKA’s time, suppliers like Crown have also been incredibly generous and donated products and services worth over £25,000 to create a welcoming and inspiring space. We hope the children enjoy it for many years to come.”

Crown Paints’ Carlisle Crown Decorating Centre has supported a unique Remembrance Day project in the city with the donation of paints and decorating sundries.

“Carlisle Remembers 1918” includes ‘This Day in 1918’, a unique event hosted in Carlisle Castle on Saturday 10th November to commemorate the 100 year anniversary of the signing of the Armistice agreement.

The event will show what life might have been like in Carlisle Castle 100 years ago, with a cast of colourful characters such as the Depot Commandant, his Regimental Sergeant-Major and his wife. Included is a full-scale replica of the Mark IV tank which sat outside the castle gates until 1935 and a 160-foot reconstruction of a British and German trench system.

The tank was created by local craftsman Geoff Armstrong and – unlike the original, which was in service during the final year of the First World War – it is built entirely from timber.

The Crown Decorating Centre donated undercoat and eggshell paint in the tank’s signature dark green colour as well as brushes and roller kits to complete the works. A further donation of masonry paint was used as part of the trench reconstruction, making the trench look much more believable.

Colonel Anthony Stevens of Carlisle Remembers 1918 said: “‘This Day in 1918’ brings the past to life with an immersive experience for visitors to the castle, and the replica tank and its crew, along with the WWI trench system, help our visitors understand the realities of life for soldiers on the front line in the Great War.

“I’m very grateful to the army of volunteers who made the day possible, particularly to Geoff Armstrong for creating the tank and to Ronnie Papaleo for designing and creating the trench system – Crown’s donation made both of these displays much more authentic and I appreciate the help that Mandy and her team at the Crown Decorating Centre gave us.”